A Century of Black Life, History, and Culture

Photograph of Carter G. Woodson, 1915.

Photograph of Carter G. Woodson, 1915.

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is celebrating its centennial. For one hundred years the group has existed to serve one purpose:

To demonstrate to the world a truth that had been everywhere assaulted–that people of African descent had contributed significantly to the making of civilization and the movement of human history.

To demonstrate to the world a truth that had been everywhere assaulted–that people of African descent had contributed significantly to the making of civilization and the movement of human history.[1]

One hundred years ago two men from Harvard, one from Yale, and a prominent physician from Provident Hospital could only dream of the way in which the contributions and achievements made by African Americans would no longer be denied but instead lauded and celebrated. The Luria Library proudly joins in the celebration of these great Americans.

Here are ways that you can join in the celebration as well:

The ASALH puts out two publications to which the library provides access. The Journal of African American History, formerly the Journal of Negro History, and the Black History Bulletin. You can access these journals with your pipeline login and password.

During the month of February, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) will send you a daily fact about Black History if you sign up here.

And don’t forget our research guides. One of your friendly librarians created a research guide for Black Studies Research including multiple resources to help you discover some of the contributions of African Americans.

1. Scott, D.M. (2015) The founding of the association. Retrieved from http://asalh100.org/2014/10/11/the-founding-of-the-association-2/