English 103 – Madison

causes of addiction diagram

About this guide

This guide provides students with recommended resources to complete the English 103 Research Project. Use the tabs to navigate through the pages of the guide.

Your Assignment

English 103 Research Project: Select a topic related to addiction, conduct an interview, write a 5-7 page research paper, and give a 5-minute presentation to the class.

Writing Assistance

The SBCC Writing Center can help with the process of writing your annotated bibliography.

Terminology to Understand

  • Reference Books vs. Reserves vs. References
  • Periodicals: What they are and the difference between scholarly and popular
  • Abstract

Need more help?

Have a question? Stop by the Reference Desk, or contact a librarian by phone, text, or chat for more help.Contact Us

Print Reference Sources

Reference books are a good place to begin your research. These resources are available in the Luria Library Reference section, behind the Reference Desk:

  • Addiction: A Reference Encyclopedia — R 616.86 P125a 2010
  • The Encyclopedia of Addictive Drugs — R 615.78 M649e
  • Encyclopedia of Substance Abuse Prevention, Treatment, & Recovery — R 362.29 F533e 2009
  • Tobacco in History and Culture : An Encyclopedia — R 394.14 G653t

Online Reference Sources

To access these resources from off campus, you will need to log in with your Pipeline account information:

Books

Search the library catalog for print books and ebooks on your topic.

Articles

Search for articles in library databases. These resources will require you to log in with your Pipeline account information when you access them off campus.

For a variety of articles on a broad range of topics:

For articles with a more specific focus:

For news articles:

Evaluating Websites

Finding good websites for college research can be challenging and time-consuming. Be sure to evaluate any websites you find on your own, using the P.R.O.V.E.N. Test for Evaluating Sources:

  • Purpose: The reason the information exists
  • Relevance: The importance of the information for your needs
  • Objectivity: The reasonableness of the information
  • Verifiability: The truthfulness and accuracy of the information
  • Expertise: The source of the information
  • Newness: The timeliness of the information

See the MedlinePlus Guide to Healthy Web Surfing for tips for evaluating health information you find online.

Recommended Websites