ESL 124 – Reading Level 4 – McGarry

About this guide

This guide provides students with recommended resources for ESL 124 with Professor McGarry. Use the tabs above to navigate through the pages of the guide.

Assignment

Find an article online or in the library describing a current event. Students are encouraged to consider an article related to the topics we’ve read about and discussed in class (growing up, looking for love, living between two worlds, or a contemporary look at the Beatles or Shakespeare’s plays “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” or “Hamlet.” However, other topics may be considered in consultation with the instructor. Students should annotate (make notes and outline) their article and prepare to give an oral summary about the content to the class.

Have a question? Stop by the Reference Desk, or contact a librarian by phone, text, or chat for more help.Contact Us

Vocabulary

  • Academic journal: A periodical written for students, teachers, researchers, or other professionals in a particular field. (See “Periodicals” and “Scholarly journal.”)
  • Article:A piece of writing published, with other articles, in a larger source, such as a periodical. (See “Source” and “Periodical.”)
  • Author: The writer of a book or article.
  • Borrow: To take home library materials for a short time. (See “Check out.”)
  • Call number: The number typed on the spine of the book. The call number is like the address for where the book belongs on the shelf, so it helps you find the book in the library.
  • Catalog: An online, searchable list of the books, periodicals, and other materials the library has.
  • Check out: To take home library materials for a short time. (See “Borrow.”)
  • Circulation Desk: The place in the library where you can borrow (or check out) library materials.
  • Database: An online collection of articles or other materials.
  • Due date: The date by which you must return the library materials you borrowed (or checked out).
  • ESL materials: Books to help you learn to read in English.
  • Fiction: Stories and novels.
  • Fine: Money you might owe if you do not return library materials on time. (See “Late fees.”)
  • Keyword: A word describing your topic, which you use to search for library materials in the catalog or databases. (See “Catalog” and “Database.”)
  • Late fees: Money you might owe if you do not return library materials on time. (See “Fine.”)
  • Librarian: The professional who answers your questions in the library.
  • Magazine: A kind of periodical, usually written for a general audience. (See “Periodical.”)
  • Newspaper: A kind of periodical, usually written for a general audience and including information on current events. (See “Periodical.”)
  • Non-fiction: True stories or facts.
  • Periodicals: Materials that are published on a regular schedule, like newspapers, magazines, and academic/scholarly journals. Examples include: The Los Angeles Times (a newspaper); Consumer Reports (a magazine); and Journal of Applied Psychology (academic/scholarly journal).
  • Reference desk: The place in the library where you can ask a librarian for help. (See “Librarian.”)
  • Research guide: An online or paper list of resources or instructions that will help you complete your research for a particular class, assignment, or topic.
  • Research topic: What your research is about.
  • Resources: Materials and tools that lead you to information sources. (See “Source.”)
  • Scholarly journal: A periodical written for students, teachers, researchers, or other professionals in a particular field. (See “Periodicals” and “Academic journal.”)
  • Source: A book, article, person, website, or other place from which you get information.
  • Subject: What book or other source is about.
  • Title: The name of a book or article.

Print Reference Sources

Reference books provide background information on a topic. Good resources on a variety of topics are available in the Luria Library Reference section. Ask a librarian for help finding the best reference source for your research.

Online Reference Sources

To access this resource from off campus, you will need to log in with your Pipeline username and password.

  • Credo Reference Contains the full text of nearly 600 encyclopedias, dictionaries, bilingual dictionaries, and other reference books.

Books

The library’s has both print books as well as online ebooks.

Search the library catalog, or ask a librarian for help finding books on your topic.

Articles

The Luria Library’s databases provide online access to articles from periodicals (magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals). From off campus, you will need to log in using your Pipeline account information.

For articles from periodicals on any topic, try these databases:

If your topic has to do with a controversial issue, try searching for information in one of these databases:

  • CQ Researcher Provides in-depth, unbiased coverage of both sides of controversial issues related to health, social trends, criminal justice, international affairs, education, the environment, technology, and the economy.
  • Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center Provides opinions and other information on hundreds of today’s hottest social issues.

Websites

Finding good websites for college research can be difficult and time-consuming. Use the P.R.O.V.E.N. Test for Evaluating Sources to evaluate any websites you find.

Additional Resources

For improving your writing and reading skills, use this link to English as Second Language Learning Resources available to you online for free.